A lot of people believe that acne is caused by oil and dirt. This isn’t necessarily true. There are many causes for acne and having oil is just one of them. There are hormones, stress, medication, illness, pregnancy…

I find that one of the most major causes of  out of control acne is bacterial. Whilst it may have been started with one of the reasons above, when it is not treated the skin becomes infected and bacteria spreads and before you know it you have acne that you just can’t clear up.

There are some things that are done that just make acne worse.

Over-scrubbing or over-cleansing the skin

Scrubbing the skin will actually worsen acne, as it can compromise the skin’s protective barrier and increase irritation. People believe that cleansing and scrubbing with keep the skin cleaner therefore reduce acne. This isn’t the case. You will over sensitise the area causing redness and irritation. If the skin is irritated then this can lead to other problems. The ones I like best are enzymes or aha exfoliants. They work deeper, more thoroughly and less harsh.

Instead, gently wash with a pH-balanced cleanser to lessen inflammation. If you are using an AHA cleanser use 1 x day at night and use a cleanser more gentle in the morning.

Choosing products for oily skin

Again coming back to the first problem that people believe their acne is caused by oil so they choose oily skin products which strip the skin. Harsh cleansers, alkaline bar soaps, and alcohol-based products may worsen acne.

The gentler you are with your skin the calmer and less inflamed it will be. Strong products are great, but should be used in moderation.

You need to nourish your skin as well as have antibacterial products. It is about getting the balance right.

Choosing the wrong products

Choose non-comedogenic skincare, Noncomedogenic products don’t contain ingredients that tend to clog pores in people with acne-prone skin.

Certain ingredients found in products such as make-up, sunscreen and moisturizers are more likely to clog pores. The main culprit is Talc.

Picking at pimples

We all do this one! (and know we shouldn’t) Picking pimples prolongs healing time and raises the risk of scarring. Infected material can get pushed further into the skin, leading to more swelling and redness.

People also normally pick when their skin in unclean or they have make-up on. The area is not steralized, they don’t know what they are doing and they push and tear the skin which causes a scar to form, they either don’t get everything out (causing more infection) or they go too far (causing broken capillaries, more infection or more inflammation)

We all know not to do it!

Waiting too long to see someone

It’s time to make an appointment before acne starts taking a toll on your skin and self-esteem. The longer you leave it the worse it gets, the more scarring it causes, leading to long term damage that is hard to fix.

We have many ways to treat acne. Extraction facials, led light therapy, aha and bha peels and oxygen treatments.

It’s also possible a person could have rosacea which usually requires different treatment than acne. It is a long-term disease that causes redness and pimples. People can mix this up with acne and if you treat it as acne then your skin will flair up worse.

Over-Using a Prescribed Acne Medication

Now I might get in trouble for this, but people are prescribed medication way too much these days. It scares me. For some people it is necessary. But it shouldn’t be a 1st stop their can be a lot of unpleasant side effects. Try extraction facials 1st, try good skin care that has been prescribed to you-and give them both a good go, not just 1 facial or a product you brought from a chemist.

Stopping the treatment

The acne didn’t appear over night and it is not going to disappear over night. Facials are an ongoing solution. Depending on your skin you will start out with a facial every 1-4 weeks. When we have your skin in control we then start spacing out the facials.

Once we have cleared up your skin it is important to keep up maintainence. This is where a lot of people start to get into trouble. You acne was highly likely caused from getting one or two pimples, then one or two more, then another one and before you know it, it has blown up, Having a regular facial every 4-6 weeks gets rid of those pimples when they come up so you don’t end up back where you were.

To keep skin blemish-free, most people need to continue usage with at least one acne product. It may be a few times a week or once a day, but a good at home skin care routine is a must.  

 

“Everything that defines beautiful healthy skin is a direct result of vitamin A”

– Dr Des Ferandes

 

Vitamin A (retinol) acts like a ‘superfood’ for your skin, treating the issue and offering amazing results. It corrects deficiencies in the skin such as ageing, hydration, pigmentation or acne – and works to normalise your skin’s functions to improve its condition and revitalise your complexion.

For ageing

Vitamin A thickens and stimulates the dermis – where collagen, elastin and blood vessels live – to reduce wrinkles and increase blood flow to the surface of your skin. It increases the flow of collagen to slow down the ageing process of your skin.

For acne

Vitamin A can help to reduce the activity of sebaceous glands – when it comes into contact with oil cells it gets to work to clean up the oil slick by dramatically decreasing sebum production. In some cases, treatment with vitamin A can decrease the production of sebum by up to 90%.

For skin health

Vitamin A is both an antioxidant and a cell communicator – triggering cells to produce everything they need to keep your skin in tip-top shape. It increases cell turnover and exfoliates the skin from within to repair DNA, reprogram cellular function and recharge damaged cells to function normally again.

 

The delivery

Cosmeceutical skin care products deliver active ingredients deep into the dermis (your skin’s layers) where the real work needs to be done. Active ingredients include retinaldehyde-liposome and AGP (arabino-galactan-protein), a molecular transport antioxidant.

Other types of skin care products rarely have the ability to go as deep as a cosmeceutical without causing irritation. Cosmeceutical skin care delivers active ingredients including Vitamin A through your skin’s structures to the receptor on the cell. This delivery system is both gentle and effective to prevent dehydration, redness and irritation.

Use

To achieve the full benefit of products containing vitamin A, cleanse your skin before applying your serums to allow maximum penetration, and leave them on overnight to let them work their magic.

 

NOTE: Like many vitamins, Vitamin A is not stable and can lose its potency when exposed to sunlight, therefore we recommend using your serums at night when you skin is in a state of repair and there is no risk of exposure to UV light. Also look for packaging that protects the stability of the ingredients with minimal exposure to air and light.

 

 

The facials

We have four fantastic Vitamin A facials available at Shine – each tailored to address specific skin needs:

Retinol Brûlée –combines AHA, vitamin A and vitamin B to brighten your complexion and smooth away fine lines. Great for more sensitive skin.

Benefit Peel –offers the wow factor of vitamins A and C combined to nourish and plump your skin with vital nutrients and antioxidants.

Purity Peel –combines acne fighting powerhouse ingredients AHA, BHA, vitamin A and zinc to decongest pores for a clearer, healthier complexion.

Timeless –our top shelf vitamin A peel offers significant cell turnover resulting in smoother, denser and hydrated skin. The combination of AHAs, vitamin A and antioxidants firms up your complexion and gets it glowing.

 
Vitamin A – home care

Come in and chat to us about the right Vitamin A serum for your skin – we have five fantastic options each formulated to address different skin concerns along with delivering a good dose of ‘super’ Vitamin A into your skin.

 
Check out our new Vitamin A promotion on our specials page at shineskinandbody.com.au or see below – available until August 2017.

 

Naturally gorgeous skin needs a healthy diet.

 

“Many clients come to me and say ‘I’m doing my skincare ritual every morning and evening, but I’m still breaking out.’ One of my first questions to them is ‘How’s your diet?’ The bottom line is that whatever’s going on inside, will eventually show in outside on your skin.

 

What you eat is as important as the products you apply on your skin. Foods get digested and broken down into vitamins, minerals and amino acids that your body can uses to build healthy skin. If you crash diet or eat highly processed food, your skin won’t be as strong as it could be. E.g. If you don’t eat enough protein, you are depriving your skin of the amino acids that go into making collagen and elastin (responsible for anti-ageing and healing)

 

SUGAR

The 1st main one is Sugar. Low GI diets have been shown to be beneficial to acne-prone skin. The sugar will quickly get into your bloodstream, making your insulin levels spike, which can aggravate acne and wrinkles.

 

DAIRY

The hypothesis is that the majority of milk comes from pregnant cows, so the hormone levels in milk can play a role in excess sebum production, which promotes acne. Oil production is influenced by androgens and hormons such as insulin-like growth factors found in milk. Soy milk is made from processed soybeans, which can have estrogen-mimicking effects on the body. Any food that could potentially disturb your hormones in this way is something you’ll want to avoid as you’re going toward clear skin.

 

WATER

A lot of people ask me about water intake. Drinking 8 plus glasses of water a day is great, but most of this goes towards your important organs such as kidney, liver etc, so your skin only receives so much. But as we have discussed, if you are healthy on the inside, you will be healthy on the outside. So a properly functioning liver will help with toxins. It also helps your cells take in nutrients and get rid of toxins. The water in fruits, veggies, juice, and milk counts toward your total.

 

ANTIOXIDANTS

Antioxidants are important to slowing and preventing free-radical damage. You can find them in all kinds of foods, especially colorful fruits and vegetables The brighter or darker the better.  Tomatoes are great for helping reduce sun damage, they are high in the antioxidant lycopene, which helps fight free radicals. The antioxidant is most easily absorbed when the tomatoes have been cooked, which releases it from the plant cells.

VITAMIN A

We love recommending Vitamin A as a topical ingredient on your skin as it is the best anti-ageing ingredient as well also helping with cell turnover. But you can also top it up internally- grab an orange, carrot, or slice of cantaloupe. They’re loaded with vitamin A. You can also find it in leafy greens and eggs.

VITAMIN C

The sun can be tough on your skin. Vitamin C can help protect you. It also helps undo sun damage to collagen and elastin, which firm up your skin. Get vitamin C from red bell peppers, citrus fruits, papayas, kiwis, broccoli, and greens

OMEGAS

My favourite and the ingredient I recommend above all else. Omega-3s and omega-6s are good fats that help make your skin’s natural oil barrier, keeping away dryness and blemishes. Essential fatty acids like these help leave your skin smoother and younger-looking. You can get them from olive and canola oils, flaxseeds, walnuts, avocado and cold-water fish like salmon, sardines, and mackerel.

 

We have been very lucky lately with some wonderful reviews. Katina came and saw us recently and is writing a wonderful article about her journey on helping clear up her skin. See the link below for her 1st article and before and after pictures from her 1st facial.

http://www.katinalindaa.com/2015/09/shine-skin-body-extraction-facial.html

katina breakouts

 

 

The Diary of a Hermit: Adult Acne

Posted: Updated: 
 As I write this it’s 7am and I already know I’m going to have a bad day.

Aside from checking my phone for notifications, and slamming the snooze button, the first part of my morning routine is looking in the mirror – one that I keep right by the bed or even under my pillow. This one look will be influential enough to encourage or hinder my getting out of bed and facing the day.

This morning I’m greeted with large swollen lumps on my cheek, pustules dotted across my jawline, and a painful third eye bulging out from my uni-brow – after surveying today’s canvas I slumped back into the pillow.

I’m nearing the end of my twenties, this was meant to end a decade ago!

The physical and mental scarring began when I was twelve, a horrendously insecure age for anyone, but also the year some little oik publicly used my spots as a reason not to go out with me on a first generation social media site. But however distressed I got, I was always comforted by the fact, or myth, that as soon I turned twenty, and my teen years were behind me, that my skin would be clear like the actresses in the glossy fashion magazines and my enviably zit-less friends.

Thanks in part to my body’s intolerance to all foods I choose to consume, my face is always etched with some visual evidence of my allergies. On particularly angry days I want to stay inside – out of sight of all humans and their possible judgements. I make sure the curtains are drawn, as if I’m in the full glare of daylight (reality) I tend to repeatedly mentally ridicule my face in all reflective surfaces.

Unfortunately, a dodgy skin day is not a legitimate excuse to abandon work duties, despite its capability to drastically affect performance. I regularly curse the career path that’s landed me as a video-blogger. As a female interviewer, particularly one that talks to a lot of male musicians, I suppose I’m exposed to more criticism than if I had a more ‘normal’ job. Every time I post a new interview I fear/expect a scathing or cruel response from the notoriously uninhibited YouTube comment makers. I feel for celebrities and the level of scrutiny their looks and skin are under. I’ve always thought ‘The Circle of Truth’ type articles highlighting their supposed flaws (Cameran Diaz’ acne problem for example) were a grossly unfair part of their chosen career. On a positive note though, I found it hugely comforting that these renowned beauties weren’t perfect – they too suffered with this unsexy problem.

As well as affecting my confidence when interviewing – less eye contact, bad posture, barely looking at the camera – acne has affected other areas of my life…

My hair has always been long – apart from a failed attempt at the Meg Ryan choppy bob (City of Angels era) which turned my barnet into some sort of mushroom. Yes, it’s feminine and versatile, but the main reason behind my hairstyle is its usefulness as a natural veil. On really bad days it’s draped lankly over my face like one of those crystal beaded curtains found in launderettes. Beanie hats are also a vital apparatus used to help disguise the outbreaks on my cheeks, helpfully clamping my hair over my the problem areas – wholly necessary for blustery days. If only Balaclavas were on trend this A/W!

But acne doesn’t just affect those inflicted. Over the years my poor boyfriends have had the impossible task of minimising my anguish, when sunscreen has turned my face into something resembling lasagne for example. They’ve also had to put up with me ducking under the duvet to hide my blotchy, make-up free face every morning. Making excuses not to attend social events because I don’t want to be photographed next to the beautiful people blessed with minute pores is also common place. The prospect of having to abandon my skincare regime and reveal my bare face to others at festivals or sleepovers has always caused extreme anxiety too. It really is endless..

Of course there are many parts of me that I’d like to change, but most can be enhanced/minimised with the use of clever dressing, working the right angles…or exercising (never going to happen). Make-up can cover up redness and scar discolouration pretty well, but it can’t hide undulation or valleys, and you can’t predict when those pesky white heads will show up!

Hopefully one day I’ll won’t feel the need to sharply change route if I see someone I know on the horizon, or keep moving my face frantically when conversing to give the illusion of pixelation or airbrushing…..In the meantime, just a few things. When you say how you prefer natural girls please remember that some of us would love to go bare faced, we just can’t. When a professional explains that men naturally want to mate with women who have good skin…that really hurts. And If you tell us it doesn’t look that bad, we won’t believe you.

It’s not JUST spots… to us it’s a nightmare.

Doctors: Please, No More Antibiotics for Acne

Adult acne is a crippling condition, and one that, as Brits particularly, we often fail to address directly.

One in five 25 – 40 year old women will suffer from bad skin at some point in their lives, but common misconception suggests that acne – painful pustles and pus-filled mounds that appear on the face, chest, shoulders and upper back – is somehow the fault of the sufferer. We suspect uncleanliness or dirt is the cause, making the condition isolating and upsetting. And so, when medical professionals subscribe pills and not much else, it’s accepted as common wisdom that this must be the correct answer.

But a new proposal on a popular web resource for physicians and other health professionals has called for the discontinuation of antibiotics to treat acne and, although controversial, is exactly right.

It’s also great news for encouraging an overall general conversation about adult acne.

Muneeza Muhammad, B.A., and Ted Rosen, M.D. have proposed via Medscape.com that dermatologists should severely curtail or outright discontinue the routine and regular use of antibiotics for the skin condition.

The call to arms centers around the argument that the prevalence and worsening of P. acne resistance – the bacteria that causes acne – worldwide means doctors must think more carefully about their prescribing habits.

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a global problem, and a cause for serious concern. The emergence of “superbugs” which are resistant to most antibiotics and therefore difficult to treat is a major threat to health. In many areas of the world more than 50% of acne bacteria are resistant to the antibiotics used to treat acne, with rates continuing to rise.

Doctors normally recommend a four- to six-month course of antibiotic treatment, but once spots have cleared, acne commonly flares up again when treatment has stopped. Because of resistance fears, advice is commonly to switch to a topical cream such as benzoyl peroxide- which come with their own side effects, such as dry and tense skin, redness and peeling, or burning, itching and stinging.

It’s all confusing and upsetting news for acne sufferers, who typically don’t find a sympathetic audience to their blemish plight. Doctors seem unemotional and pill-happy, dermatologists pricey and directorial, and magazine articles that focus on less spot worry, more body confidence are obviously written by journalists who don’t know the true pain bad skin can cause.

So what’s the answer for treating adult acne?

Laura Jane Williams, author of  ACNE: a comprehensive guide to identifying, treating and generally showing spots who the boss is wrote in an online column, “why is it we can talk about in-growing pubic hairs, fanny farts, thrush and scaly dandruff, but acne is off limits?

“The thing I wanted most during my six-month pizza-face ordeal was, aside from a solution, an honest conversation about it. But I was far too embarrassed.”

The internet has done much to encourage (albeit anonymous) conversation about acne. One such example, The Lustre Clinic, acts as a social forum for suffers to discuss their problems and get confidence boosting advice from health and beauty professionals. Lustre promote the use of blue light therapy as a clinically-proven and effective solution to acne, with none of the risks associated with antibiotics or topical creams.

Scientists have found that visible blue light is one of the best solutions for acne management, and much safer to health than the alternatives. Photodynamic light therapy uses visible blue light at a wavelength of 415nm and so blasts the bacteria that cause acne without causing any harm to the skin. Spot-causing bacteria produces porphyrin, which under blue light becomes excited and destroys the p. acnes, ultimately leaving users with reduced symptoms.

There’s little general awareness of the use of light to effectively treat inflammatory acne. Traditionally, too, there has been limited accessibility to it. However, companies like Lustre are championing discreet, community-led solutions that could revolutionise acne skincare in an at-home setting.

Blue light has been used by leading dermatologists for years. Trials suggest that blue light therapy devices users can expect a 60% improvement in inflammatory acne.

In my own clinic we offer blue and red light therapy to effectively treat inflammatory acne, and suggest that any blue light therapy can be complimented with skin peels and microdermabrasion- with impressive results.

All accumulating evidence suggests with growing urgency that traditional response to acne management is no longer working. Dermatologists and doctors must be encouraged to experiment with totally safe antibiotic alternatives, and blue light therapy

At Shine we offer LED light therapy. Call us today to talk about how we can help.

could be just the trick.

In my extraction facials I do a treatment called high frequency, for those that haven’t heard of it, it is AMAZING for acne. It aids healing quicker after extractions, it reduces the chances of future breakouts and for those stubbon big sebaceous acne that you can’t get out-this will get rid of it.

Having previously suffered from acne for years, I credit this machine with keeping my breakouts in check and for not having scaring now.

I will let you know a little about how it works.

 

High-frequency treatment uses low-current, high frequency alternating currents, delivered via a glass electrode. It is used by beauty therapists to help treat and prevent stubborn acne and rejuvenate the condition of the skin. Considered a timeless and essential skin rejuvenating treatment in the skin care industry, high frequency is known to

  • ·          stimulate cell renewal
  • ·          assists with improved skin care product absorption
  • ·          helps clear up skin conditions such as acne and hormonal breakouts.
  • ·          calms down acne faster
  • ·          prevents bacteria from spreading
  • ·          used to aid healing

I use a glass mushroom electrode filled with neon or argon gas. As the High frequency current is passed down the electrode an oxygen pocket is created between the electrode and the skin causing the oxygen to become unstable and turn into ozone. This helps dry out spots and has an antibacterial effect.

I also do sparking, which is where the electrode is used to quickly and painlessly zap any pimples, I tap the spot 4-6 times. This helps heal the skin at a faster rate by drying out the pimple.

The great thing though is- it doesn’t hurt! At last something to clear skin that is painless. I normally do it while a mask is on your skin or over moisturiser. I also offer follow-up high frequency after a facial.

You will feel tingling and some warmth. When I spark sometimes you feel a bit more- but it also feels like you are killing the bacteria and killing the pimple for good.

I will always look at your skin to see whether you need it, not everyone does. There are contra-indications- heart problems, pacemaker, metal implants, pregnancy or trying to become pregnant, epilepsy.

 

Look forward to seeing you for a facial soon. 🙂

Take 10 years off your skin with Vitamin C.

Vitamin C is critical for your body and plays an important role in maintaining healthy, resilient skin. While young skin is full of vitamin C, aging skin naturally loses this nutrient over time. Other factors like exposure to UV light, pollutants and cigarette smoke (free radicals) reduce the amount of vitamin C produced in our skin, this contributes to signs of aging. (loss of tone and elasticity and wrinkles)

The good news is that you can fight back by replenishing your skin’s vitamin C. One of the most powerful functions of vitamin C is its role in the production of collagen, a protein that gives your skin its elasticity. As you age, collagen breaks down and wrinkles begin to form. Stabilizing your skin’s levels of vitamin C can help to counteract wrinkle formation by increasing collagen production.

Why use it…

  • Needed to produce collagen (firm, tone and wrinkles)

  • Needed to protect your skin from free radical damage. Vitamin C is a great anti-oxidant.

  • Protects skin structure from UV-related damage

  • Improve the appearance of sun-damaged skin

  • Prevent premature ageing.

  • Hydration by increasing hyaluronic acid

There are problems though…… 
 It’s not very stable in skincare products. All antioxidants, including vitamin C, are vulnerable to deterioration in the presence of air and light. If a product containing antioxidants does not come in opaque packaging that reduces air exposure, don’t buy it!
You need high concentrations of it to even have a chance to work by actually penetrating your skin.

Vitamin C is one of those products you get what you pay for. You want at least 5-10% activity,(more if possible) you want it encapsulated so that the vitamin C doesn’t diminish and lose its’ potency, You also want Vit E to be in the product as well as this enables the vitamin c to help enter the skin.

Taking vitamin C through a supplement or food is beneficial to your health, but to specifically target signs of aging on your face, topical vitamin C is best.

In fact, applying vitamin C to the skin can be 20 times more effective than taking it orally.

Aspect has a Vit C serum. It includes Vit E, is incapsultated, is at 20% efficiency, comes in opaque packaging and air tight. It is $115 for 30ml and lasts about 6-7 months if used once a day.

For more information just call me on 0431 430 490

We all wear make-up and wish we knew how to do it properly, but have never been taught how to do it. Well below are some tips that will help you get started…..

make up trick 1

Good Skin= Good make-up. I think about it this way, if your skin looks good, any makeup will look great,

When applying concealer to pimples and other imperfections it is recommended that you use a brush – not your fingers! The tapered bristles can get into the crevices of a blemish better than your fingers can.The best thing a girl can do is to hydrate the skin and put on a primer.

The placement of highlights for the eyes  is very important when trying to create naturally beautiful eye makeup. Your lighter colours should be applied in the inner corners, the middle of the eye, and just under your brow bone. Apply your lightest colours first. (see picture)

To keep your undereye liner in place, sweep loose or pressed powder right under the eye liner on your bottom lid. It creates somewhat of a barrier, preventing your eyeliner from traveling downward.

This quick and easy illusion will give you an instant eye lift. Draw an arch directly above your eyebrow with your favourite highlighter, and blend with your finger. This makes your arch look raised, making the whole eye area look like it’s been lifted. (see picture)make-up trick 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blush, blush, blush! It wakes up the skin and perks you up.

Cosmetic Brushes-If you don’t have the right application tools, even the most expensive products won’t go on properly

What’s the trick to applying blusher? Always allow about two fingers from your nose to where the blush starts.

It’s best not to use a similarly coloured lip-liner when wearing a bright shade of lipstick. Instead, line your lips with a shade slightly darker than your own lip colour.

You can attract light to your lips and make them look fuller simply by applying a shimmery gloss to the centre of your top and bottom lip.

Suffering from bloodshot eyes? White eyeliner or shadow in the corners of your eyes will counteract the redness and awaken your eyes again.

 

AHA’s (alpha hydroxy acid) is a natural exfoliating ingredient that is found in fruit and milk. This is the lightest form of a chemical peel. Peels dissolve intercellular glue within the skin, encouraging dead cells to shed and fresh skin to come to the surface, revealing fresher more vibrant skin. They retexture, smooth and brighten the skin. Rough or dry patches can be resurfaced, uneven pigmentation spots can be reduced and the look of fine lines and wrinkles can be improved as cell turnover is increased and damaged skin cells are shed. There is no downtime and no redness afterwards.

In regards to acne we can use AHA or BHA peels. BHA peels have the ability to get deeper into the pore than AHA as they are smaller molecules. BHA are oil loving peels so seek out oil helping to control oil, acne as well as remove dead skin cells to a certain extent better than AHAs, but they can be more irritating and the skin needs to be prepared before starting.

After this there are more intensive peels you can do. They can target pigmentation or acne or total resurfacing. You need to be careful; peels can get very powerful and have a lot of downtime associated with them. The cause quite a lot of trauma to the skin. These are for people with quite a serious problem and are prepared for the downtime associated with them (peeling, redness, sensitivity) Before starting strong peels you skin should be prepped with lighter peels first, sometimes lighter peels are all that is needed. it is best to get a recommendation off someone if you are going to do a strong peel.

At Shine Skin and Body we work with Aspect peels ranging from 20-40% there is no downtime afterwards but they show great results when done in a series.

_Click to read more…..